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MUSICAL TIMES hd-line

Treble Clef

The Treble Clef is the most popular clef used and is also called the G clef. In short, it means that the keys played will be a higher pitch (thus why it says treble.)

It spirals around the 2nd line of the stave which tells us were on the G note.

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The notes around the G clef can now be figured out by relating to middle C as well.

The Bass Clef

The second most used clef is the Bass Clef which is sometimes called the F clef. These are basically keys that are low in pitch.

This clef’s spiral rests on the F note on the second line.

Lorem Ipsum is simply dummy text of the printing and typesetting industry. Lorem Ipsum has been the industry's standard dummy text ever since the 1500s, when an unknown printer took a galley of type and scrambled it to make a type specimen book.

The piano will use both of these clefs. Looking at the keys so far together gives us this:

Lorem Ipsum is simply dummy text of the printing and typesetting industry. Lorem Ipsum has been the industry's standard dummy text ever since the 1500s, when an unknown printer took a galley of type and scrambled it to make a type specimen book.

The Alto Alto Clef

The Alto Clef also called the C clef lies in third line of the stave which is the middle. Since the Bass Clef and Treble Clef cover most of it, the The alto clef is sometimes criticized for its lack of use. It primarily pertains to the Viola, but considering they get to sit in the middle of the orchestra goes to show how important they actually are.

The notes around the G clef can now be figured out by relating to middle C as well.

The Tenor Clef

The Tenor Clef is similar to Alto Clef but is placed on the fourth line of the stave instead of the third. It’s meant for bass heavy instruments that require a larger range like the Bassoon or Trombone.

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